Business Professionals

Santa Approved?!

Santa is often one of the first to discover great gifts–and this year is no exception! Santa ordered up a Little Prompter!  Even better . . . he gave it a 5 star review on Amazon!  He wrote a a number of nice things, including:  I’ve been creating Videos from Santa since 2007, and I’ve tried everything I could think of to make them better and produce them faster . . . in less than 5 minutes, the Little Prompter took me from 11 years as an amateur to a real professional.”  For the rest of Santa’s great review–and for several more, visit Amazon, and click on those 5 Stars.

Santa Ed Amazon Review

Instructional Video

The Little Prompter & Your iPad

Most ipads and tablets have a great built-in camera. The Little Prompter can slide neatly over your ipad, so the camera can look through the Little Prompter’s glass. You still need a smart device with a teleprompter app to rest on the Little Prompter’s tray, and be able to stand your ipad up, but the Little Prompter is defintely able to help you have a flawless delivery using your ipad or tablet!

Here’s another shot of it from the side:
LP on iPad Sideview Dining Room Table_for web

Instructional Video

Who should be on camera in your Instructional Video?

Effective instructional videos can vary in style.  This short video, inspired by an Arizona State University study, reveals preferences and effectiveness in two different styles:

  1. Should you teach to the camera/viewer or
  2. Should you teach a student who is also on camera and film that interaction?

This video featuring Dann Hurlbert, Carleton College’s Media & Design Guru succinctly recaps a 2018 study from ASU’s Katelyn M Cooper, Lu Ding, Michelle Stephens, Michelene T. H. Chi, and Sara E Brownell.  And, you bet, Dann used a Little Prompter to ensure a flawless delivery.

*this blog post was originally posted on Carleton College’s Academic Technology Blog

Instructional Video

Facing Instructional Videos

In my role at Carleton College, I work directly with faculty to help them plan, produce, and evaluate darn-good instructional videos.  One topic that often comes up is “should I include my face in the video?”  My gut answer is . . . “yes.”  Various studies indicate videos with faces are preferred by students, and any chance we have to help students enjoy their learning, the better.  Here’s a short video that brings all that research together into a single, easily consumable nugget:

And for those interested in keeping up with Academic Technology at Carleton, here’s our blog.  http://blogs.carleton.edu/academictechnology

Instructional Video

Getting Good Video: Tip 1 of 3, Camera Positioning.

Camera Positioning:  There is a lot of fun psychology behind camera angles, but we’re going to keep this simple. To connect with your audience on a personal level, placing your camera at or slightly below eye-level is important.

High angles make you seem weaker or less important, low angles can make you seem aloof (or give your viewer a straight shot up your nose)—neither of which are attractive.  The eye-level-shot helps you seem most approachable.