Business Professionals

The British are coming! (And they like the Little Prompter.)

Josh Hicks is a camera guru.  I’ve never met him, but I’ve now seen some of his tech reviews and he’s a bright and talented guy.  He unboxes, demonstrates, reviews, modifies, and uses, the Little Prompter in about 8 minutes.  If you’re a video pro and debating about a teleprompter for under $200, you gotta watch his review.

Josh Hicks Reviews the Little Prompter
Josh gives the Little Prompter a thorough test run, and raves about it.

(Note:  The Little Prompter does work well with any pro and pro-sumer camera–even if the weight shifts backwards a little–but this gave Josh a chance to highlight his impressive 3D design skills.)

 

 

Business Professionals

Santa Approved?!

Santa is often one of the first to discover great gifts–and this year is no exception! Santa ordered up a Little Prompter!  Even better . . . he gave it a 5 star review on Amazon!  He wrote a a number of nice things, including:  I’ve been creating Videos from Santa since 2007, and I’ve tried everything I could think of to make them better and produce them faster . . . in less than 5 minutes, the Little Prompter took me from 11 years as an amateur to a real professional.”  For the rest of Santa’s great review–and for several more, visit Amazon, and click on those 5 Stars.

Santa Ed Amazon Review

Instructional Video

Who should be on camera in your Instructional Video?

Effective instructional videos can vary in style.  This short video, inspired by an Arizona State University study, reveals preferences and effectiveness in two different styles:

  1. Should you teach to the camera/viewer or
  2. Should you teach a student who is also on camera and film that interaction?

This video featuring Dann Hurlbert, Carleton College’s Media & Design Guru succinctly recaps a 2018 study from ASU’s Katelyn M Cooper, Lu Ding, Michelle Stephens, Michelene T. H. Chi, and Sara E Brownell.  And, you bet, Dann used a Little Prompter to ensure a flawless delivery.

*this blog post was originally posted on Carleton College’s Academic Technology Blog

Instructional Video

Facing Instructional Videos

In my role at Carleton College, I work directly with faculty to help them plan, produce, and evaluate darn-good instructional videos.  One topic that often comes up is “should I include my face in the video?”  My gut answer is . . . “yes.”  Various studies indicate videos with faces are preferred by students, and any chance we have to help students enjoy their learning, the better.  Here’s a short video that brings all that research together into a single, easily consumable nugget:

And for those interested in keeping up with Academic Technology at Carleton, here’s our blog.  http://blogs.carleton.edu/academictechnology

Instructional Video

Getting Good Video: Tip 2 of 3, Lighting

Lighting:  Good lighting makes your video quality seem MUCH better.  Be sure to add light to your focal point (which is your face for most of these videos)—and avoid too much brightness behind you. A bright background darkens your face—and viewers tend to trust well-lit faces more than those in shadow.

Easy ways to get good lighting include setting a lamp on your desk or facing a window during your recording.

Instructional Video

Getting Good Video: Tip 1 of 3, Camera Positioning.

Camera Positioning:  There is a lot of fun psychology behind camera angles, but we’re going to keep this simple. To connect with your audience on a personal level, placing your camera at or slightly below eye-level is important.

High angles make you seem weaker or less important, low angles can make you seem aloof (or give your viewer a straight shot up your nose)—neither of which are attractive.  The eye-level-shot helps you seem most approachable.