Little Tips Blog

Instructional Video

Prompted to Go World-Wide

The number of requests we’ve received from people to make the Little Prompter available around the world is fantastic . . . and humbling.  Thanks to everyone from Slovenia to New Zealand and from Switzerland to New York!  While we’re already selling Little Prompters on our website and through Amazon.com, we’re also working with re-sellers overseas to make the Little Prompter more easily accessible globally.  Until then, anyone anywhere can now order a Little Prompter at www.littleprompter.com/order-now!

LP 3x3 Simple Tool Logo on BLUE EUROPE_Now Shipping Anywhere

 

Instructional Video

The Little Prompter & Your iPad

Most ipads and tablets have a great built-in camera. The Little Prompter can slide neatly over your ipad, so the camera can look through the Little Prompter’s glass. You still need a smart device with a teleprompter app to rest on the Little Prompter’s tray, and be able to stand your ipad up, but the Little Prompter is defintely able to help you have a flawless delivery using your ipad or tablet!

Here’s another shot of it from the side:
LP on iPad Sideview Dining Room Table_for web

Instructional Video

Who should be on camera in your Instructional Video?

Effective instructional videos can vary in style.  This short video, inspired by an Arizona State University study, reveals preferences and effectiveness in two different styles:

  1. Should you teach to the camera/viewer or
  2. Should you teach a student who is also on camera and film that interaction?

This video featuring Dann Hurlbert, Carleton College’s Media & Design Guru succinctly recaps a 2018 study from ASU’s Katelyn M Cooper, Lu Ding, Michelle Stephens, Michelene T. H. Chi, and Sara E Brownell.  And, you bet, Dann used a Little Prompter to ensure a flawless delivery.

*this blog post was originally posted on Carleton College’s Academic Technology Blog

Instructional Video

Facing Instructional Videos

In my role at Carleton College, I work directly with faculty to help them plan, produce, and evaluate darn-good instructional videos.  One topic that often comes up is “should I include my face in the video?”  My gut answer is . . . “yes.”  Various studies indicate videos with faces are preferred by students, and any chance we have to help students enjoy their learning, the better.  Here’s a short video that brings all that research together into a single, easily consumable nugget:

And for those interested in keeping up with Academic Technology at Carleton, here’s our blog.  http://blogs.carleton.edu/academictechnology

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Getting Good Video: Tip 3 of 3, Get Good Audio

Getting Good Audio:  Of course you can always purchase excellent quality microphones, but the Little Prompter is designed to work with your existing microphone—either your device’s onboard mic or the one you attach separately.

Regardless of the microphone you use, your focus is to eliminate background noise as much as possible.  This means finding a quiet location to record, turn off fans or other noisy appliances, and be aware of the hums of air-conditioners.  In life, we tend to tune those sounds out without even noticing, but on video those background hums and hisses can be very distracting.

In the rare case where your onboard microphone is entirely covered by the Little Prompter—which happens with just a few device models—you may want to purchase a good quality USB mic, too, but give the Little Prompter a test run first.

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Getting Good Video: Tip 2 of 3, Lighting

Lighting:  Good lighting makes your video quality seem MUCH better.  Be sure to add light to your focal point (which is your face for most of these videos)—and avoid too much brightness behind you. A bright background darkens your face—and viewers tend to trust well-lit faces more than those in shadow.

Easy ways to get good lighting include setting a lamp on your desk or facing a window during your recording.

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Getting Good Video: Tip 1 of 3, Camera Positioning.

Camera Positioning:  There is a lot of fun psychology behind camera angles, but we’re going to keep this simple. To connect with your audience on a personal level, placing your camera at or slightly below eye-level is important.

High angles make you seem weaker or less important, low angles can make you seem aloof (or give your viewer a straight shot up your nose)—neither of which are attractive.  The eye-level-shot helps you seem most approachable.